VUMC Department of Biomedical Informatics - Events                  

  ==> Below are links to access past DBMI Seminar and Research Colloquium recordings. A VUNetID and 2-factor authentication are required:
                2020-2021 DBMI Seminars                 2020-2021 Research Colloquia

ALL DBMI SeminarResearch ColloquiumPhD DissertationMasters ThesisSummer Seminars
Date & TimeEventLocation & LinkSpeaker(s) and TitleLearning Objectives and/or Abstract
Wednesday
Apr 21, '21

12:00 PM

DBMI
Seminar
ZOOM Webinar

[Link]

Dara Mize, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Biomedical Informatics
Department of Medicine
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, & Metabolism Vanderbilt University Medical Center

"Clinician Well-Being and the EHR: Who’s Really to Blame?"

  1. Understand the scope and societal impact of clinician burnout.

  2. Describe the reciprocal domains of clinician well-being.

  3. Identify opportunities for informatics to respond to the burnout problem.
The dissonant relationship between clinicians and the EHR is well-documented, as is the professional and societal impact of clinician burnout. Well clinicians perform better, but the absence of burnout does not capture the full extent of what it means for a clinician to be well. There are personal and organizational factors that influence clinician well-being and contribute to burnout. This session will review the current state of clinician burnout, describe drivers of clinician well-being and demonstrate opportunities for informaticists to respond to the burnout problem. ...
Wednesday
Jun 9, '21

12:00 PM

DBMI
Seminar
ZOOM Webinar

[Link]

Eric Minikel, PhD
Associated Scientist, Broad Institute
Co-founder, Prion Alliance

"A genetically informed paradigm for primary prevention of prion disease"

Prion disease is a uniformly fatal, presently untreatable neurodegenerative disease with a single molecular cause: misfolding of the prion protein (PrP). Progression from first symptom to death usually takes just months, and most patients are in a state of profound dementia by the time of diagnosis. Individuals with prion protein gene (PRNP) mutations may know their genetic status decades in advance of symptoms, creating an opportunity for early therapeutic intervention to preserve full cognitive function and quality of life. Successful realization of this opportunity will rest upon several pillars informed by genetics: i) pharmacologic validation of the therapeutic hypothesis that PrP lower ...